Ngurdoto Crater

  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy

Key information: Ngurdoto Crater

    • Walk around the rim of this lush, beautiful collapsed volcano (caldera).
      • Gaze over this special, secluded area with its swamp, grassland and forest which harbour a multitude of wildlife.
        • Most of the walk is in the thick montane forest of the calderas outer rim, with occasional vistas to the crater floor.

Walkopedia rating

  • Walkopedia rating80
  • Beauty30
  • Natural interest18
  • Human interest0
  • Charisma32
  • Negative points0
  • Total rating80

Vital Statistics

  • Maximum Altitude: 1,850m
  • Level of Difficulty: Moderate
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© William Mackesy

WALK SUMMARY

The beautiful Ngurdoto Crater in Tanzanias Arusha National Park was created by the collapse of an ancient volcano, leaving a ring of dramatic cliffs approximately 3km across.  Some 400m below, the secluded crater floor is half swamp and the rest grassy plain dotted with elegant thickets of trees - in an echo of English parkland, a thick forest at the northern end.

Much of the walking is the forest of the rim, though, so come prepared to enjoy this as much as the more glamourous crater views.

You can follow the 10km 4x4 track around the crater rim, through lush montane forest which includes strangler fig, orchids and ferns. Other than near the top of the access road, there is little traffic, and you will be alone with the birds - vast hornbills may flap ponderously overhead - and the forest.

Every so often, you will catch outstanding views of the crater floor: animal tracks crossing the grassland like a complex pattern of veins; a huge herd of buffalo; hippos, perhaps, in a pool in the exuberantly reeded swamp. One thing is for sure: no humans interfere with life down there.

For practical information relevant to this walk, see our Mt. Meru page, much of which is relevant to this page.

Other accounts: share your experiences

Your comments on this walk, your experiences and suggestions, and your photos are very welcome. Where appropriate, you will be credited for your contribution.

© William Mackesy

Safety and problems: All walks have inherent risks and potential problems, and many of the walks featured on this website involve significant risks, dangers and problems. Problems of any sort can arise on any walk. This website does not purport to identify any (or all) actual or potential risks, dangers and problems that may relate to any particular walk.

Any person who is considering undertaking this walk should do careful research and make their own assessment of the risks, dangers and possible problems involved. They should also go to “Important information” for further important information.

Anyone planning an expedition to this place should see further important information about this walk.

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© William Mackesy...
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